Mono Hull 22" Deep V Boat

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Josh Hess
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Mono Hull 22" Deep V Boat

Postby Josh Hess » Thu Feb 25, 2016 9:47 pm

Every year at my university, there is an engineering project which involves autonomously carrying an orange around a large fountain pound. This year, the engineering lab I work at is supplying TI micro controller boards and sensors to the competing teams. Although I can not compete, I will need a boat to test the board and sensors in and also to show as an example to the teams as they build their own.

The last boat I built was an 18" mono hull with a shallow v. You can also find the plans for that here: http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=854832 I ended up modifying the hull to fit an in-runner jet drive and some other things. I have a few videos of it here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=P ... j1L-f3APdN It was however a bit to small for the weight and it also did not cut through the water very well as the v profile on the belly was too shallow. I will be addressing these issues as well as making the templates digital to be used in a laser cutter for the new hull. In addition to the hull, I will also be designing and 3D printing a jet drive unit. I will be doing a separate topic about that at a later time and the files will be available for download there.

22" Deep V Mono Hull Templates: viewtopic.php?f=22&t=15

I started with what I had. I took the templates from the link above and manually traced them in inkscape. They were all terribly unsymmetrical, so I took the traces and rebuilt them one by one. After that, I extended the bottom such that the V profile was 24 degrees. This makes it a mono hull a deep v and should allow the boat to handle the chop and turn better at high speeds. I also scaled everything up so that the overall length is about 22". Once I'm done and have tested the my drawings, I will attach them to this post.

I started cutting out parts and assembled the basic frame. Since I have modified the v profile, I will have to resize the two bottom sheets. I am going to do this via estimation and trial an error testing. Alternatively, I could CAD the boat in 3D but this trial and error will be easier since I have access to a laser cutter. Anyway, here are some picture from where I left off today:
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That's it for now, I will post more tomorrow once progress is made.
Science may set limits to knowledge, but should not set limits to imagination.

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Josh Hess
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Re: Mono Hull 22" Deep V Boat

Postby Josh Hess » Tue Mar 01, 2016 12:02 am

I made decent progress since the last update. The frame has been finished with stringers and I have finalized the sides and started the gluing of them. Let's take a look at some pictures!
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Gluing the sides:
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That's it for now! I will be working on the bottom more tomorrow and the it will be time to start sanding and finishing.
Science may set limits to knowledge, but should not set limits to imagination.

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Josh Hess
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Re: Mono Hull 22" Deep V Boat

Postby Josh Hess » Wed Mar 02, 2016 1:14 am

I let the sides dry camped overnight and it turned out great! Today I cleaned up some parts and attached one of the bottom boards to it. Let's take a look at some pictures:
There was a little overhang on the top but I made it flush by filing it down to the side
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The next thing to do was to get started on the bottom paneling. I had a test piece that was a bit too big that I didn't want to waste so I decided to use it and do some cleanup after glueing. I will be making a template that is much closer to the actual size for the other half and to include in the final template.
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As you can see, there was a lot of overhang that needed to be cut off. I did this initially with a hack saw blade, but switched to a handy woodworking saw later.
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Here you can see the raw cut from the saw on the left to the smooth filed finish on the right.
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And after about an hour of filing, the finished edge.
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Science may set limits to knowledge, but should not set limits to imagination.

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Josh Hess
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Re: Mono Hull 22" Deep V Boat

Postby Josh Hess » Fri Mar 04, 2016 12:28 am

Since the last post I have made a lot of progress. I have drawn and tested and glued the main bottom piece as well as the bottom prices by the jet intake area. I have finalized a version of the templates if anyone wants to download them aswell.

Here you can see the second main bottom piece held in place with rubber bands. I designed the template to leave a little less than a quarter of an inch on the edges for filing and the center seam lines up perfect when bent to the formers.
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Next it was on to the pieces near the jet intake. Like the first main bottom piece, I started with a piece of scrap and worked it by hand to size. After that I measured and drew it to be cut and tested. In the future, I will have these pieces be one with the main bottom pieces in the template for easier construction.
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Finally it was on to the triangle piece that lowers the v to the flat part for the jet intake. There is a name for this design but it escapes my mind at the moment. Like the other pieces, it was done by hand and then drawn in the template.
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Well that's it for now! There are a few minor tweaks I will do and then I will be waiting on the jet drive to finish the intake mount. This will take place after spring break in about a week. After that, it's on to be fiberglass we and painted!
Science may set limits to knowledge, but should not set limits to imagination.

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Re: Mono Hull 22" Deep V Boat

Postby Josh Hess » Sat Mar 05, 2016 2:27 am

Alright so the jet part actually came in today so a bit of progress was made with the cading of it. The jet pictured below is $70 and the total budget for the project is $80. To get around this problem, we are cading a custom version of it and 3D printing it. These files will also be available once finalized.
I decided to finish the bottom with an uncut piece of wood. I will cut the intake hole for the jet later by hand:
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Here is the jet:
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And fitted in the hull:
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The cusom jet we will print will be slightly shorter but will use the same diameter impeller and should have similar thrust.
As I was trying to layout internal electronics, I decided to make a nice stand for the boat so it wouldn't wobble around. Here are some pictures of that and also the initial electronics layout planning:
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This will be the last post for about a week as my spring break starts tomorrow and I'll be going home. When I return, it will be time to start fiberglassing and testing the custom jet aswell as the electronics and programming!
Science may set limits to knowledge, but should not set limits to imagination.

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Re: Mono Hull 22" Deep V Boat

Postby Josh Hess » Wed Mar 30, 2016 12:36 am

This is a little update before the real exciting stuff begins! Since I have returned from spring break, I have given the hull a coat of epoxy resin. I decided not to use fiberglass because I didn't have any and the plywood I used is plenty strong and only needs to be sealed. I did the outside and inside with slightly acetone diluted epoxy to allow it to soak into the wood optimally. After this cured, time was spent sanding the drips and brush marks to give it a near perfect finish. Here are some pictures:
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Now that the hull is basically done, there are only two things left to do, the jet and the electronics. Fortunately, my coworker Mike has been helping me CAD the jet and I started the 3D print today so that will be ready tomorrow. I also have started playing around with the electronics and I have some example code for the kits we are making. By the next post, I presume that I will be testing the boat in water for leaks, checking performance of the jet, and starting on the electronics/programming.
Science may set limits to knowledge, but should not set limits to imagination.

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Josh Hess
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Re: Mono Hull 22" Deep V Boat

Postby Josh Hess » Fri Apr 01, 2016 2:26 am

I 3D printed the jet drive assembly and it turned out great! The printer we have in the lab I work at has awesome resolution and is a dual head. This allows for support filament to be used for really precise and conplex shapes to be printed with ease. Here are some pictures of the parts:
Fresh out of the printer:
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After a bath to wash away the support material:
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Next it was time to see how it all fit together. I discovered that there was a rough line on the inside of the nozzle that needed to be sanded down in order to interface smoothly with the seal peice. After a bit of sanding, it fit and moved perfectly.
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Next, I used a bit of paint to mark the inside of the hull to see where to cut by positioning the jat and spraying inside it. The red area was then cut out and the jet fitted.
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The only thing left to do is acquire and install the brass tube that holds the impeller shaft and then mount and leak test the jet in the hull. I will be going to graves rc tomorrow to get the tubing and some batteries. I expect that the hull will be ready for water testing tomorrow night or Saturday morning the latest. That's it for now, more updates to come!
Science may set limits to knowledge, but should not set limits to imagination.

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Josh Hess
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Re: Mono Hull 22" Deep V Boat

Postby Josh Hess » Sat Apr 02, 2016 1:41 am

Good progress was made again today. I went to my local hardware store (Ace Hadware) and bought some brass tubing to be used for the bearing and the packing tube. I had to get two different sizes, one that fit in the other as the ones they had were very thin walled. Here are the pieces:
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These were cut to length and fit with one inside the other. My original plan was to solder them together, but I decided against it as it was unnecessary.
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This was then glued into the jet drive duct. In order to ensure proper spacing, the impeller was wrapped in tape until a snug fit was achieved between it and the duct.
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The last thing to do was mount the jet in the hull. First I screwed the flanges from the duct and the stator together to align the jet in the hull. This was followed by taping the bottom edges around the intake of the jet. This was to prevent epoxy from leaking out between the hull and duct intake.
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The last thing to do was mix and apply some epoxy. Enough was applied that a small layer formed around the intake to completely seal around it. Some epoxy was also applied around the flange and brushed on the duct itself. Due to the printing characteristics of the 3D printer, the abs is somewhat water permeable. Although this probably wouldn't have been an issue, I decided to seal it anyway to be safe. The epoxy around the flange dripped down into the bottom layer so I am expecting leaks there and will most likely have to redo it at a different orientation so the epoxy pools.
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Well that's it for today, it will be all cured by tomorrow morning so I will do some leak testing and maybe even some initial thrust tests tomorrow!
Science may set limits to knowledge, but should not set limits to imagination.

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Josh Hess
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Re: Mono Hull 22" Deep V Boat

Postby Josh Hess » Sat Apr 02, 2016 11:34 pm

I started today with a leak test. It turned out that the flange around the output leaked like I suspected. My solution was to reapply epoxy at a different orientation so that it would pool around the flange and seal it.
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Once this dried, it was sanded down and was ready for a second leak test. It passed! Now I was itching to see what this jet could do! For the first test, I used the larger nozzle and ran the motor at 12 volts.

youtu.be/SVoC8kfMkwg
For the second test, I wanted to try the smaller nozzle and also measure the current going to the motor. It was pulling 15A and this nozzle provided almost double the thrust as the water was expelled at a much higher velocity. However, the higher pressure made water spray out between the nozzle and the stator. This is probably a result of my sanding to make it turn smoother and could be fixed by printing a new seal.

youtu.be/kAkDhi0iHak

The third test I tightened the screws on the nozzle and this helped the spraying a bit but it was still very leaky. Although this is an inefficiency, it won't be a problem.

youtu.be/H61ZpVCh-QY

To finish up, I installed the servo for the nozzle and started laying out the electronics.
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That's it for this post, work will resume Monday. I would like to try controlling it with an esc and radio controller to see how the hull handles at high speed and with turning but that depends if I can borrow one from someone. Also I will be starting the electronics and the programming. Anyway, more to come!
Science may set limits to knowledge, but should not set limits to imagination.


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